Rio Dulce Chisme Vindicator Forum Index Rio Dulce Chisme Vindicator
riodulcechisme.com
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch      UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

PROVES HOW WRONG EVERYONE WAS ABOUT MANUEL ZELAYA

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Rio Dulce Chisme Vindicator Forum Index -> Honduras... news and views
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
markfisher
Souper Duphus Senior River Rat


Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 2187
Location: Guatemala / San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:58 am    Post subject: PROVES HOW WRONG EVERYONE WAS ABOUT MANUEL ZELAYA Reply with quote

I THINK I WAS THE ONLY ONE WHO QUESTIONED HIS OUSTER IN THE FORUM
NOW READ THIS PROVES I WAS CORRECT !!!!!!!

MORE FROM FOX NEWS

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras – Less than a decade ago, even talk of re-election was enough to get a Honduran president overthrown.


Now Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez appears likely to win a second term on Sunday as well as bolstering the strength of his conservative National Party across the board.

"Hernandez is not just trying to win presidential re-election, he's trying to expand his power from top to bottom, including in the legislature and at the mayoral level," said James Bosworth, the founder of Hxagon, a consulting firm that does predictive analysis in emerging markets.

Fears of just that sort of consolidation — but by left-wing rivals — led Hernandez's own party to back a military coup in 2009 against a president it accused of plotting to violate Honduras's seemingly iron-clad constitutional ban on re-election.

The country's highest court backed the 2009 ouster of Manuel Zelaya. But the current court — packed with Hernandez' supporters — ruled in 2015 that the constitution could not prevent him from running again — outraging opposition leaders.

"This ruling was a betrayal of the country," said union leader Carlos H. Reyes. "It is humiliating to live in a country where a dictatorship that answers to the oligarchy is trying to install itself."

Some opposition leaders formed the leftist Opposition Alliance Against Dictatorship precisely to oppose the re-election bid. The Alliance is running Salvador Nasralla, while the traditional Liberal Party is running Luis Zelaya, a middle-of-the-road candidate. There are another six candidates from tiny opposition parties, but the president remains the clear front-runner.

His popularity is based largely on a drop in violence in a country whose homicide rate was once among the world's worst. The country's National Autonomous University says the homicide rate has dropped to 59 per 100,000 from a dizzying high of 91.6 in 2011.

Still, Hondurans among the hemisphere's poorest people, and even if killings have tapered off somewhat, street gang violence has frightened many people into trying to flee to the United States.

And corruption remains a major problem for Honduras, casting a shadow across Hernandez's administration.

A convicted drug trafficker testified in a New York courtroom this year that he met with Hernandez' brother Antonio to get the Central American country's government to pay its debts to a company that the trafficker's cartel used to launder money.

Devis Leonel Rivera Maradiaga, ex-leader of the cartel known the Cachiros, testified that Antonio Hernandez asked him for a bribe in exchange for government contracts. The brother has denied that allegation.

And in September, the son of a former president from Hernandez's party, Porfirio Lobo was sentenced in New York to 24 years in prison after revealing his role in a cocaine trafficking conspiracy. Fabio Lobo, 46, pleaded guilty in May 2016, admitting he worked with drug traffickers and Honduran police to ship cocaine into the United States.

[/b]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
dennysbeach
Senior Lake Rat


Joined: 22 Oct 2009
Posts: 377
Location: lake isabal

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ho-hum. Once again the same crap.
Honduras is and will continue to be a shit-hole.
Guatemala may be incredibly corrupt but Honduras is in another league.
_________________
Dennis Gulck
Manager
Dennys Beach Resort Hotel
La Costa de Oro
Lago de Izabal
4636-6156 / 5171-7477
denny@dennysbeach.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
markfisher
Souper Duphus Senior River Rat


Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 2187
Location: Guatemala / San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Denny hope all is well. Anyway, the main point was Hillary got rid of Zalay unjustly because he only wanted to put it on ballet vote to change it so 2 terms would work for him. Now the same people who got rid of him, with the support of the USA for that reason are doing the same thing for which they deposed Zalay. If you go back to that time on the Chisma I was the only person who defended Zalay. the Media and US Government did such a good job that everyone on the Chisma bashed Zalay even though he was doing good for the poor that make up 80% of the Honduran people
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
markfisher
Souper Duphus Senior River Rat


Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 2187
Location: Guatemala / San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 5:48 pm    Post subject: HEAR WE GO ONCE MORE BET THE USA IS INVOLVED???? Reply with quote

News
Honduras opposition candidate alleges fraud in presidential vote
AFP News AFP News 55 minutes ago
Reactions Like Reblog on Tumblr Share Tweet Email

Opposition candidate Salvador Nasralla is photographed during his interview with AFP in Tegucigalpa on November 28, 2017
Honduran opposition candidate Salvador Nasralla on Tuesday accused incumbent President Juan Orlando Hernandez of trying to steal the Central American country's bitterly disputed election by faking poll results.

Leftist TV host-turned-politician Nasralla said Hernandez was colluding with the army and the electoral authorities to forge new results sheets and give himself the edge in Sunday's presidential election.

"He's fabricating (the results)," Nasralla told AFP in an interview.

"He controls the media. He's going to have the results sheets he wants validated and change the will of the people."

The election in this poor, gang-plagued country has turned into a drawn-out showdown between Nasralla, 64, and Hernandez, 49, who is going for four more years in office despite a constitutional limit of just one term.

Both candidates have declared victory, but the results are far from clear.

In the early hours of Monday, Nasralla led by five percentage points with 57 percent of ballots counted.

Then the Supreme Electoral Tribunal interrupted its live broadcast of the results and announced the rest of the ballots would be brought to the capital, Tegucigalpa, to be counted.

On Tuesday, the election authority posted new results on its website: 44.4 percent for Nasralla to 40.5 percent for Hernandez -- about one percentage point narrower than the opposition candidate's previous lead -- with just over 61 percent of the ballots counted.

Nasralla accused the conservative president of plotting to rig the vote, saying his "survival instinct" was hijacking democracy.

"He knows if he's not the president any more he'll be extradited" to face corruption charges, he told AFP.

"He's trying to sow chaos so he can declare a state of emergency and take control with the help of his people and the army."

- President urges patience -

Hernandez for his part asked Hondurans to be patient.

Officials have said the final vote tally may not be ready until Thursday.

In his first public appearance since declaring himself winner Sunday night, Hernandez said his supporters are right to take to the streets in celebration, as they have done.

Speaking at a press conference, he again insisted he has won the presidency and his party the largest number of seats in congress.

"The result is more than clear," he said at the presidential residence.

But Hernandez also said people must wait until all the ballots are counted.

"It is important for everyone to be patient, for everyone to be considerate with Honduras," he said.

Hernandez's conservative National Party -- which controls the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government -- contends that a 2015 Supreme Court ruling allows his re-election.

Nasralla and his coalition, the Opposition Alliance Against the Dictatorship, have denounced the incumbent's bid, saying the court does not have the power to overrule the 1982 constitution.

Situated in the heart of Central America's "Northern Triangle," where gangs and poverty are rife, Honduras has one of the highest murder rates in the world -- though it has fallen under Hernandez.

What credit he claims from that progress, however, is counterbalanced by tensions over his re-election bid.

It is a loaded issue in Honduras, where former president Manuel Zelaya was toppled in a coup in 2009 -- notably because he was accused of plotting to change the constitution to stand for a second term.

Nasralla has close ties to Zelaya, who remains a popular figure.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
dennysbeach
Senior Lake Rat


Joined: 22 Oct 2009
Posts: 377
Location: lake isabal

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You probably don't remember but Mel was very cozy with Cuba, Venezuela, Equador, and Bolivia. Fuel more than anything and from a real leftist govt.
Your democrats are not leftists, in fact far from it. I have to laugh every time I see someone calling them 'the left'.
This could not be allowed by the powers in Washington and thus he was flown to
Costa Rica in the middle of the night in his pijamas.
Adios, Mel. He is actually a member of our family and I liked him a lot.
He forgot to never mess with the 'commies'.
_________________
Dennis Gulck
Manager
Dennys Beach Resort Hotel
La Costa de Oro
Lago de Izabal
4636-6156 / 5171-7477
denny@dennysbeach.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
markfisher
Souper Duphus Senior River Rat


Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 2187
Location: Guatemala / San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Op-Ed Honduran democracy is under assault

Soldiers patrol a street in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Dec. 12. (Fernando Antonio / Associated Press)
Steven Levitsky, Carlos Flores
Latin America hasn’t had the kind of “color revolutions” that swept across Eastern Europe and the Middle East in the 2000s. But Honduras’ recent descent into authoritarianism may have created the conditions for one.

The country’s democracy is under assault.


While serving as head of the Honduran Congress in 2012, Juan Orlando Hernandez orchestrated the sacking of four out of five Supreme Court justices and their replacement with partisan allies. Soon afterward, Hernandez was elected president.

Hernandez’s government is among the most authoritarian in the hemisphere. Its human rights record is deplorable. Dozens of journalists and human rights activists, including the indigenous rights activist Berta Caceres, have been killed — almost always with impunity.


President Hernandez has undermined Honduras’ already fragile democratic institutions. The Honduran Constitution strictly bans presidential reelection. But in 2015, Hernandez’s packed Supreme Court ruled, outlandishly, that the term limits enshrined in the constitution were “inapplicable” to him, thus paving the way for his illegal reelection bid last month.

Although most Hondurans disapproved of his reelection, a second term for Hernandez appeared inevitable, thanks to the ruling National Party’s abuse of public resources and the fact that the opposition was divided between the center-right Liberal Party and the center-left Opposition Alliance.

But the Opposition Alliance’s candidate, Salvador Nasralla, a former sportscaster, pulled off an electoral surprise on Nov. 26. With nearly 60% of the votes counted, Nasralla led by almost five percentage points. One of the magistrates on the Supreme Electoral Tribunal, or TSE, called his lead “irreversible.” The third-place candidate, Luis Zelaya of the Liberal Party, publicly recognized Nasralla’s victory.

Recently, U.S. support for democracy has waned.
Then the TSE went silent for more than 24 hours. And after a mysterious “computer glitch,” updated results showed Hernandez ahead. This dubious shift triggered accusations of fraud, not only from the Opposition Alliance but also from the Liberal Party and reputable media outlets, including the Economist. The Organization of American States criticized the election’s “irregularities, errors and systematic problems” and called for a recount.


Hernandez’s government responded by imposing a curfew and repressing protesters. According to Amnesty International, at least 14 people, including a teenage girl, have been killed during post-election protests. More than 800 people have been arrested.

The disputed election has united diverse opposition groups and sparked a protest movement calling for a full and transparent recount. Adopting nonviolent tactics used by color revolution protesters in Serbia, Ukraine and Tunisia, Honduran youth have led thousands in peaceful rallies and held candlelight vigils to signal their dissent.

Students have distributed white flowers to soldiers and police, some of whom have refused to obey government orders to repress protesters. Orchids, Honduras’ national flower, are being drawn on walls throughout the nation’s capital, Tegucigalpa.

The stage appears to be set for an “Orchid Revolution.”

But the movement needs help. The international community must press the Honduran government to agree to a full and transparent recount — and, if it becomes necessary, to a new election.

Pressure from the United States is particularly important. Although the U.S. often tolerated and even supported coups in Latin America during the Cold War, it became a stronger proponent of democracy in the region in the 1990s. In 1993, the U.S. helped Guatemalans force President Jorge Serrano from office after he closed Congress. In 1994, after Dominican President Joaquin Balaguer rigged an election, the U.S. successfully pressured Balaguer to hold new elections and retire. That same year, American troops restored a democratically elected president to power in Haiti. And U.S. diplomats helped block a military coup in Paraguay in 1996, and another in Ecuador in 2000.

Though hardly spotless, the U.S.’s record of promoting democracy in the Americas was, on balance, positive in the post-Cold War era. This helped to make the last quarter-century the most democratic in Latin American history.

Recently, however, U.S. support for democracy has waned. This change has accelerated under Donald Trump, the first American president in decades to openly embrace autocrats.

The Trump administration has been silent about Hernandez’s abuses, including last month’s election irregularities. Because U.S. officials view the right-wing Hernandez as an ally, they seem willing to give him a pass on democracy and human rights. Indeed, just after the election, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson certified that Honduras has been combating corruption and protecting human rights — two congressional requirements for U.S. assistance under the Alliance for Prosperity initiative. This appears to have emboldened Hernandez.

The consequences of American inaction extend far beyond Honduras. When the U.S. embraces autocrats and tolerates stolen elections, it sends a clear signal across the region: Democracy can be subverted without serious international repercussions. As in the dark days of the Cold War, aspiring autocrats will know that as long as they remain friendly with the U.S., they can trample on democracy and human rights with impunity.

We cannot return to the Cold War policy of opposing autocrats only when they are considered enemies and turning a blind eye when they are considered friends. Americans should embrace pro-democracy movements like the burgeoning Orchid Revolution, not the autocrats who repress them.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Fretless
Super Senior River Rat


Joined: 15 Nov 2009
Posts: 1087

PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let me understand... Honduras is on the verge of a revolution so ... blame Trump?

When America gets involved in other countries to depose dictators by supporting civil unrest/revolution it's a war mongering Western colonialist. Remember Qaddafi, Assad, support for the Muslim brotherhood in Algeria & Egypt?

But when the U.S. has a president that chooses get out of nation building, not get the U.S. involved in the internal affairs of other nations, suddenly (because Trump) U.S. support for democracy has 'waned' and 'openly embraces autocrats and tolerates stolen elections'.

Hondurans have every right to label U.S. intervention as 'hardly spotless'. Remember When Obama/Clinton supported Honduran President Manuel Zelaya when he attempted to re-write their constitution and their congress voted to remove him from office?

Honduras has a permanent representative in the United Nations. Maybe it's time for them to do their job instead of relying on the U.S. to be the worlds police force.

I fervently hope Honduras will remain bloodless while resolving its issues. Given it's likely the most politically corrupt nation in Central America (not unlike Venezuela to the South) that could be a long shot.
_________________
Veni, Vidi, Velcro;

(I came, I saw, I stuck around)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
raja
Super Senior River Rat


Joined: 23 Jul 2008
Posts: 302

PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 12:35 pm    Post subject: blame Trump? Reply with quote

you must remember who you're dealing with here...Mark and the Ca. liberal left blame Trump for everything, i wonder if they blame Trump for Ca. being the leader in state population loss in the U.S. or the fact that most large cities in U.S. with most money problems are run by democratic mayors..i'm betting on it!
_________________
scared to death of dying,but not afraid to live
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
markfisher
Souper Duphus Senior River Rat


Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 2187
Location: Guatemala / San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


"Hondurans have every right to label U.S. intervention as 'hardly spotless'. Remember When Obama/Clinton supported Honduran President Manuel Zelaya when he attempted to re-write their constitution and their congress voted to remove him from office?"

A bit miss informed. All Zallya wanted was to only put a ballot measure at the next election to change the law to 2 terms. Then a coopt and put on a flight to coast Rica in his P J's. By the USA backed right-wing leaders
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
markfisher
Souper Duphus Senior River Rat


Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 2187
Location: Guatemala / San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


About That Stolen Election in Honduras
The US is keen to keep the oligarchy in power.
By Vijay Prashad / December 19, 2017, 9:13 AM GMT


‘The people are calling it a fraudulent and stolen election’, said Dr. Luther Castillo Harry, when I asked him about the late November election in Honduras. Castillo Harry, who was the National Commissioner of Ministry of Health in the Honduras, looks despairingly at his native country. The institutions in his country have succumbed to bribery and coercion. He nods his head in pain, thinking about how a combination of the oligarchy and the United States has suffocated Honduras.

The current president, Juan Orlando Hernández, has destroyed whatever minimal legitimacy the state institutions once had. In 2012, as the head of the Honduran Congress, Hernández sacked four of the five Supreme Court justices and put in their place those loyal to him. This Court, friendly to Hernández then suggested that the term limits on presidential power were ‘inapplicable’ to him. He could run for re-election in November 2017. When it became clear that he was not winning the popular vote, the Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE) shut down its system. Thirty-six hours later, when the vote count appeared, Hernández was in the lead. He has now been declared the winner.

Castillo Harry’s despondency is not without basis. Things are so bad that even the Organization of American States, normally happy to toe the US line, has been outspoken in its condemnation of the stolen election. OAS asked Dr. Irfan Nooruddin of Georgetown University to look at the TSE data and at the dramatic vote swing that occurred over the 36-hour period of silence. His report, published December 17, shows that there are glaring irregularities in the process. ‘The pattern of votes,’ Dr. Nooruddin writes, ‘is suspicious.’ He shows that the irregularities cannot be explained ‘as pure chance.’ This is out-and-out rigging.


Report Advertisement
Based on Nooruddin’s report, the OAS Secretary General, Luis Almagro, offered a most detailed denunciation of the election. It is worth reading in full.

‘Deliberate human intrusions in the computer system, intentional elimination of digital traces, the impossibility of knowing the number of opportunities in which the system was violated, pouches of votes open or lacking votes, the extreme statistical improbability with respect to participation levels within the same department, recently printed ballots and additional irregularities, added to the narrow difference of votes between the two most voted candidates, make it impossible to determine with the necessary certainty the winner.’

This is as close to an invalidation of an election as one could get.

The person who ‘lost’ the stolen election, Salvador Nasralla of La Alianza de Oposición contra la Dictadura, the opposition front, has called for a re-election. This is just what the OAS has also demanded: ‘a new call for general elections.’

Hernández is not keen to call a new election. He has tried to use the full force of the military and police establishment to crush any protest. Hundreds of people have been injured and dozens killed. The numbers rise with each hour. Castillo Harry says that the same kind of repression used in the 1980s is now visible. In fact, Hernández’s advisor for security comes from the CIA-created death squad, Battalion 316. Sections of the security forces loyal to Hernández have been entering people’s homes at night, arresting them, disappearing them. ‘We have a large group of missing comrades,’ says Castillo Harry. They ‘have been captured and disappeared and are not yet reported as missing.’

But matters are not entirely grave. Castillo Harry points to the sections of the security forces that have refused to comply with the President’s orders. Four hundred members of the elite COBRAS special unit of the police returned to their barracks. They would not fire on their fellow Hondurans. Castillo Harry says that the president personally called the barracks to urge them on. He promised higher salaries and better benefits for the military if they too did his bidding. That there have been these some ‘human rights mutinies’ suggests that there is a fracture in the repressive forces. There is hope here.

The United States has fully backed Hernández in his campaign for re-election. Professor Dana Frank of the University of California Santa Cruz and a close observer of Honduras told me that Trump’s Chief of Staff John Kelley was close to Hernández when he was the head of Homeland Security. He called Hernández a ‘good guy,’ a ‘great friend’ and said that Hernández was doing a ‘magnificent job.’ Stolen election or not, Frank says, ‘Everyone knows that the US wants Hernández in power no matter what.’

Palmerola (Soto Cano) Air Base, in Comayagua, 50 miles northwest of the capital Tegucigalpa, is one of the few major US military bases in Latin America. It was set up in 1983 for the US to support its contra allies in Nicaragua and its allies in the Honduran military. It is said in Honduras that the US actively participated in the coup against President Zelaya in 2009 because his agenda included the closure of this base. It should be pointed out that the US has directly intervened in the Honduras several times to protect its interests: in 1903, 1907, 1911, 1912, 1919, 1920, 1924 and 1925. Since the 1980s, however, it has relied on friendly people in the Honduran military and in the Honduran oligarchy to do its bidding. No wonder then that the US is keen to keep the oligarchy in power rather than allow left-leaning Nasralla and his popular alliance to take office.

Castillo Harry is on tour of the United States to speak out about the stolen election. He is being joined by mayors of several cities in Honduras, including Mayor Jose Arnold Avelar Hernandez, who is a leading member of La Alianza de Oposición contra la Dictadura. They would like the people of the United States to ensure that the Trump administration not be allowed to validate the stolen election. Heide Fulton, the top US diplomat in Honduras, said that the US ‘is ready to work with whomever is the winner.’ The problem is that in a stolen election, the winner did not necessarily win.

Dario Euraque, who was in the cabinet of the deposed government of Zelaya, told me that there is ‘extreme anger, sadness and hope’ in the country. Hope comes from the ‘mobilizations and creativity of the people despite the repression and isolation.’ These protests are indeed continuing. Frank agrees, ‘The current protests build on deep, brave commitments on the part of ordinary Hondurans.’ Castillo Harry says that these protests are ‘in the hands of the community based organizations.’ This element, he says, did not exist so robustly in 2009 to defend the government against the coup. Today, he says, there are more than 134 places around the country held by the resistance, with young people in the lead. Almost all those who have been killed are young activists.


Report Advertisement
‘Only the people save the people,’ Castillo Harry says, repeating a slogan that has appeared in the protests. The walls of cities and towns in Honduras have been painted with the orchid, the national flower. Until 1969, the national flower of Honduras was the rose, although the rose is not native to the country. The orchid however is native to Honduras. There is a poetic sense that this protest is of people who want to take their country back. The stolen election is perhaps the last straw.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Rio Dulce Chisme Vindicator Forum Index -> Honduras... news and views All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group